Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 41 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: Task Analysis & Journey Mapping #4218
    SP
    Keymaster

    Task analysis considers the user path as a flow chart. While user journey is more comprehensive and considers how the user feels as he/she moves through different stages of his task. For an objective view of user tasks, especially to create screens, task flow is used. While, to improve UX and to find what are the current customer pain points and frustrations, customer journey or user journey is mapped out. User journey can also include mentions of user comments & expressions at each stage of his journey.

    in reply to: Contextual Enquiry & Ethnographic Studies #4216
    SP
    Keymaster

    It is more or less the same. Both studies the user in a particular environment. In the world of UX, contextual enquiry is the term generally used. Ethnography is more an academic term used in Anthropology, sociology and other pure academic settings etc.

    in reply to: Target Users #4214
    SP
    Keymaster

    Need not be. Typical family with 2 to 3 kids can be a persona. But you have to consider other possibile persona such as newly wedded couple. Also you can look at it from a different perspective – such as affordability/income. Look at all the possible ways in which you can group users with unique goals and sensibilities and tasks.

    in reply to: User Expertise #4212
    SP
    Keymaster

    You have to decide this based on how good are they with technology. If they can use smart phones, you should assume they are fairly good with technology. If they use feature phone, they can be either not so tech savvy or their motor/cognitive skills do not allow them to use smart phones perfectly.

    Also if the product expects user to have some special knowledge or background to use the product, then you can categorize people based on their background knowledge as well. Imagine you are working on the UX of a specialized software like SAS used for econometric analysis. To use the software the user should have good background in Statistics and mathematics. So even if the person is good with technology, he/she may not be able to use it if the user does not know statistics or mathematics. So background knowledge is also equally important just like their level of technology friendliness.

    in reply to: Wireframes #4210
    SP
    Keymaster

    Yes. Wireframing is prototyping. But fidelity will be low. Yes, ideally wireframes are presented with as litle visual elements as possible. So when the user is presented with the wireframe, he will only notice the function an feature. If the prototype presented to him has visual elements, user focus will most obviously be directed to those visual elements. And when we are in the process of coming up with a better information organisation and structure of the product, we cannot afford the user to focus on the visual aspects. So yes, at the wirframing stage itself you need to start taking user feedback.

    in reply to: Beliefs & Design #4208
    SP
    Keymaster

    Belief systems can be related to time consciousness, ethical beliefs, independence, organisation etc. So if the person is very strong in any of the traits, then your product can make use of the same. For example, an alert system will let the user know that user has a scheduled activity will help him organise his time and day better.

    in reply to: Persona & Hobbies #4206
    SP
    Keymaster

    Not only hobbies, but anything that has no relevance to the persona’s task related to product should be avoided. You have to decide if hobby has any relevance to the persona & task persona performs in the product.

    in reply to: Usability Testing & Distraction #4204
    SP
    Keymaster

    No. Because to understand the actual distractions and to know if the users are frequently distracted its always best to conduct Contextual enquiry than survey.

    in reply to: UX Honeycomb #4202
    SP
    Keymaster

    You can generally say so. But you need to come up with more precise goals for the product in question.

    in reply to: Impact & Vision Document #4200
    SP
    Keymaster

    Yes. its always better for BA and UX person to work in sync. Because BA mostly focuses on capturing the business requirements & the technology that is used to achieve the same along with other project milestones and constraints. But BA rarely focuses on user level requirements and to understand what is the mental model of the user. So to add that user side to the project its always best that BA and UX person work in sync. If not in sync, UX person should have BA created vision and scope document as a starting point of his exploratory user research.

    in reply to: User Requirements, similar to Use Cases? #4198
    SP
    Keymaster

    Usually user requirements are gathered and they become the basis for creating user stories or use cases. User requirements from a strict technology documentation standpoint get translated into features and functionalities of the product. Use cases is a way of presentation of user context of product usage that can be achieved by a set of features and functionalities.

    in reply to: “Affordances” are same as “Call to Action” ? #4196
    SP
    Keymaster

    Affordances are properties of screen elements that make their use self explanatory. The clickability of a button is what gives the button its affordance.

    Call to action is anything on a screen that works as a trigger for the user to perform an action. For example, button. When the user finds the button, and immediately if the user recognises that the button is clickable, then that button has affordance.

    in reply to: Out of Stock #4194
    SP
    Keymaster

    Better not to display. But if you have a potential date when the product will become available, then that point of interaction can be used to collect user’s email and mobile number that can lure the user back to the website.

    in reply to: Simultaneous Stimuli #4192
    SP
    Keymaster

    Excellent observations. It is better to avoid simultaneous stimuli. However, multimodal stimuli may be used:

    1. If one stimulus supplements the other and adds to multisensory integration and gives a holistic experience of cognition to the user.

    2. when there is room for multisensory enhancement. That is if only one stimulus (any one of visual, auditory or tactile) is used and it results in very small response from the user. Then it clearly shows that more than one stimuli may be used for achieving the desirable user response. But at the same time, care should be taken to ensure that the modalities supplement one another to create multisensory enhancement. But the downside of multimodal stimuli is that it can lead to intersensory redundancy – example – a presenter reading the content on the slide shown on the screen. The audience can also read the same content. This leads to intersensory redundancy and leads to poor UX.

    Choice of stimuli should depend on the context & user’s capabilities. Through contextual enquiry, the UX researcher needs to identify the user’s context-dependent-constraints of information processing and decide the stimuli. For example, if the person is using a mobile app while commuting with train’s noise all around, and the mobile device is in his trouser pocket, the only way the app will get attention would be through haptic stimuli because of his auditory and visual constraints to receive the stimuli. If the same app throws an alert when at home with mobile device carelessly placed on the table and the user watching TV on the couch, then auditory stimuli will be best suited than visual or tactile. Please see the supplementary video and article attached with the lesson for better understanding of the concept.

    in reply to: Culture Dimension Theory #4189
    SP
    Keymaster

    Companies develop its localized version of the product based on the Culture Dimension specific to the country. The product features should match the Culture nuances prevailing in that country. Product’s UI and brand should also reflect the prevailing culture. A carefully designed product considering the local culture of that country should have a predominant Dimension that should make best use of the prevailing culture of that country. This is why when multinational products get launched in India, we will see advertisements and websites showcasing family values reflecting the collectivist dimension of India while the same product will reflect more individualistic or another dimension for other countries.

    So we need to understand which cultural dimension prevails in the country and develop the product based on that to effectively localize the product design and branding.

    Here is the Urdu Gmail Inbox as an example to consider
    Urdu Gmail Inbox

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by SP.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 41 total)